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joesurf79

School me - When do you NEED a hose with a stainless braided outer layer, and when will a rubber "push-lock" type hose do?

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I got my surge tank concept installed, and tested over a weekend of abuse - works great. I made some excessively long AN stainless braided overlay lines, with the intent of going back and trimming them and tidying up the installation. Fellow junkies warned me that the stainless lines in close proximity to one another would abrade the stainless, and eventually the rubber hose inside if unchecked, and I'd end up as a flambé' (I am of French ancestry afterall ;). Inspecting quickly for how to make the install cleaner - I saw one spot where the stainless looked slightly abraded already - the line connections at the tank swung more than I thought they would, contact that wasn't anticipated happened, glad I caught it. 

That got me thinking - I defaulted to the braided line because that is what I had seen done before. But the stuff is stiff, hard to route around tighter corners, and the stainless braided overlay in reality is just there to be the pressure carrying element in the equation from what I gather? Now that I know that the stainless braided overlay is NOT to be trusted for ultimate abrasion protection, I started thinking - why not just use a rubber "push-lock" type hose? They're rated for plenty of pressure for this system (45 psi peak) more flexible, easier to assemble, can easily be slid into an abrasion / fire resistant sleeve that would provide equal protection from the "incidental" contact the stainless braided line provides, and can be had in ethanol resistant flavors... Is there any reason not to run a non-stainless braided line in this type of application? Other than the loss of "bling".

Taking into account the need to isolate ANY line being used for fuel from repetitive abrasive motion, and keep them away from hot / moving parts, is there a driving reason to use / make / hassle with the braided AN lines in a low pressure application?

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I use hose separators on my ss oil cooler lines, work like a charm.  With 3 lines, you can use them on lines 1-2 and 2-3, to make sure the lines do not touch.

Something like this:

https://www.amazon.com/6AN-Hose-Separator-Clamp-Mounting/dp/B07L49Y9LM

Edit: That's a bad picture on Amazon, you do not hoses to rattle loose inside the clamps.

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Yeah I have seen those. I'll snag some - whether I go push-lock as the final solution or stick with the stainless braid, should help - "you gotta keep 'em sep-er-ated".

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Looking last night, the Russell's brand "twist lock" hose resists ethanol degradation and is rated to 250 psi. It's a bit of a torturous routing path my fuel lines are taking now, and those would be easier to route without the stiff stainless braided overwrap. Thinking I may redo my lines with that stuff and use some flexible abrasion sleeve over them, and the hose separators between. And hose clamps on the barbed ends for piece of mind?

 

 

 

 

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Depending on the location on the car and the sanctioning body you play with (or potential future ones?), take that into account.

SCCA's requirement is that any hose carrying flammable fluids (oil, fuel, etc) that run INSIDE the cockpit should be at minimum braided steel lines, or covered with a metal shield and isolated to prevent spraying of flammable substances inside the cockpit.  I'm sure you can guess why. 😉

But under the car?   nobody cares. just make sure it's protected so that you don't rupture a line on a rock or something.  

When I bought my RX7, the send and return lines between the fuel pump/cell and the FPR in the engine bay are the blue push-lock stuff.   I'm running a carb setup with only 4psi of pressure, but the lines are right there under the car.  they're routed next to the brake lines in roughly same as the factory hardlines so they're in a relatively safe spot, but they're still exposed to the ground if I were to have a MAJOR off and go airborne over rocks or something.  but at that point, all bets are off in a 40yr old car.

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