Jump to content
joesurf79

Towing capacity questions...

Recommended Posts

Should an F350 dually with a goose neck, be towing the 5 chevy equinoxes on the two level car hauler? Not sure, but the driver was having a chat with Sugar Land's finest. I'm sure its legit.

post-1644-0-87136700-1552088715_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post

Assuming max tow capacity of 18000lbs, it would be damn close. Curb weight of an Equinox is 3,274 to 3,682 lbs, according to Google.

Share this post


Link to post

Plus trailer...doubting the legitness now lol

 

Right. Doesn't seem possible, but it could be close... probably not, though.

Share this post


Link to post

Could it have been a Super Duty?  They look similar yet those can tow utterly unbelievable weights up to 27,500lb. 

Share this post


Link to post

Could it have been a Super Duty?  They look similar yet those can tow utterly unbelievable weights up to 27,500lb. 

 

Oh dang, you're right. 2018 Super Duty can tow up to 34,000lbs. That's wild.

Share this post


Link to post

Oh dang, you're right. 2018 Super Duty can tow up to 34,000lbs. That's wild.

 

That's ~15 Miatas.

Share this post


Link to post

You've gotta make sure you've got a CDL when towing those heavy loads like that.....27K + from what I recall? 

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, Captain Buddha said:

You've gotta make sure you've got a CDL when towing those heavy loads like that.....27K + from what I recall? 

26k lbs 

farm equipment and RV’s are exempt also 

 

Share this post


Link to post

Pretty soon the F150 will tow 1.25 Million Pounds 😂.....

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
16 hours ago, lobster said:

26k lbs 

farm equipment and RV’s are exempt also 

 

That's dependent on the state you live in.  TX and other southern states (in general) are much more lax on those rules.   people in new england area and east coast have a much larger issue towing in and through due to their more stringent laws.  be very careful towing in those areas unless you are familiar with the laws.   like you can't even tow a friend's car "for free" through there without a CDL and the required commercial registration, insurance, DOT logbook, etc.

for TX, LA, and OK, you're pretty much free to do what you want and tow wherever you want as long as you're under 26,000lbs gross.

Share this post


Link to post

 

What state exactly didn't adopt the federal commercial motor vehicle safety act of 1986 ? 

I know that Massachusetts did, as did Rhode island, as did new jersey, Maine, New Hampshire and  New York.  

To my knowledge I believe there is a almost universal acceptance across every state for that after around 1992.   

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post

Don't shoot the messenger.  I don't travel outside TX, OK, LA with a trailer, but I'm on a multitude of car forums and routinely hear the nasty stories of being pulled over 1/4 mile past the state line and held because of a regulation the driver wasn't aware of.

Every state has slightly different regulations regarding towing.  Trailer capacity, driver license/ credentials, what is considered an RV or commercial vehicle, max gross weight, max trailer width, max towing speed, etc etc etc.  There is a wealth of information online regarding all of those issues and the intricacies of each state.

The issue isn't the driver's credentials itself, but how the state law interprets the rules for requiring a specific type of license.  i.e. if you're towing one race car- fine, it's a "toy".  but you're hauling two Miatas in a 34' trailer?  Ohhh now THAT needs a commercial license in some states because who would ever tow more than one vehicle unless you were doing it for commercial purposes.   DOT considers a commercial motor vehicle anything above 10,001lbs GCWR, and thus some states require anyone operating a vehicle above 10,001lbs to have commercial credentials and paperwork.

Share this post


Link to post
7 hours ago, Matt93SE said:

Don't shoot the messenger.  I don't travel outside TX, OK, LA with a trailer, but I'm on a multitude of car forums and routinely hear the nasty stories of being pulled over 1/4 mile past the state line and held because of a regulation the driver wasn't aware of.

Every state has slightly different regulations regarding towing.  Trailer capacity, driver license/ credentials, what is considered an RV or commercial vehicle, max gross weight, max trailer width, max towing speed, etc etc etc.  There is a wealth of information online regarding all of those issues and the intricacies of each state.

The issue isn't the driver's credentials itself, but how the state law interprets the rules for requiring a specific type of license.  i.e. if you're towing one race car- fine, it's a "toy".  but you're hauling two Miatas in a 34' trailer?  Ohhh now THAT needs a commercial license in some states because who would ever tow more than one vehicle unless you were doing it for commercial purposes.   DOT considers a commercial motor vehicle anything above 10,001lbs GCWR, and thus some states require anyone operating a vehicle above 10,001lbs to have commercial credentials and paperwork.

I'm not shooting the messenger I'm shooting the messengers message.   

 

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.

Any state that has adopted the federal commercial motor vehicle safety act of 1986 isn't going to be hypocritical to the above.  Which btw... is most states if not all.   I cant currently think of what states if any have not adopted that standard.   

Based on your "message" my F150 would be a commercial vehicle when towing my corvette because the GCWR is over 10K  (which is wrong in 100% of the states in the country) 

 

There also exemptions to that.   Which I highlighted some already. 

But believe what you want I guess.    

 

ETA: you probably didn't  mean GCWR so not entirely off base i reckon. 

 

Share this post


Link to post

Ok, if it's a dually, by definition it's Super Duty. Properly equipped, an F350 dually Powerstroke can pull up to 26,500 trailer. Ok, if he's hauling all these SUV's for business, by definition, he needs a CDL. If he's hauling them for himself and not business (highly unlikely) he only needs a non-commercial Class A license. This is the same license I have to pull my 16,900lb 5th wheel with my F350 dually. In Texas, if you are hauling a trailer and load in a non-commercial capacity (like a 5tth wheel RV) and the total combined weight (not actual weight, but stickered weights from the truck and trailer) is greater than 26,000 lbs, you need to have a non-commercial Class A license. My truck has a stickered weight of 14,400lbs and our 5th wheel has a stickered weight of 16,900lbs, thus the need for the Class A license. 

Nothing is ever considered "commercial" unless you are towing for a business. Towing several race cars on a trailer for your own use, no matter the weight is never commercial. You may need a different class license (as stated above) but that would be a non-commercial form of that license. 

Share this post


Link to post

Properly equipped F450, is around 31,000lb trailer capacity.

 

f350 diesel towing capacity photo - 1

Share this post


Link to post

*shrug*  you're again arguing with observations posted from other places.  numerous racers have been stopped while traveling through other states for exactly the reasons I mention above.  some were fined for violations that pertained only to that state, some were sent away with an education and a warning, some were turned around at the state line and refused entry.  I'm not just making up BS or crying doomsday, and I wasn't there so I don't know all of the details.  and since these conversations were months/years in the past, I can't dig up appropriate links to the forum/thread where you can argue with them.   

So I'll stop beating my head against a wall and simply say to do your homework. just because you're legal in TX doesn't mean you're legal everywhere.

Share this post


Link to post

 

jesus this is why i hate the internet.   

you heard some shit on the internet about some mystery violations and heard a story second hand from a cop that "educated" someone on a law that is 100% counter to the actual law thats been adopted by virtually every state and then you tell me to do my homework.  

I guess ill tell my OTR employees to go home, they obviously need to defer to Matt for state by state insight because they've been violating matt law when doing pickups/deliveries.   

 

 

I'm not going to argue that the sky is purple and made from chocolate.   just do your homework.  

 

 

 

 

for the record, I also understand that states have varying statutes regarding trailering/towing etc.  

a combined weight of over 10K doesn't automatically make it a commercial vehicle.  In some states however you can be required to stop at weigh stations.   

Some states determine "commercial" or not based on whether or not you received services or payment for the transported load.   Some states don't give a crap unless you're towing/hauling under the umbrella of a company.   

The weights governing commercial vehicle requirements are adopted nationwide to elminiate the nonsense you think is happening.  

 

When in reality whats happening is that states can have stricter definitions of what they constitute commercial  or require weighing regardless of commercial or not. 

 

 

but im done.... I'm gonna go sell all our trucks and trailers now. 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post

Hmm funny.  you just agreed to pretty much everything I was stating, only in different terms..  

How about I hop in my wayback machine and remember exactly which thread in which forum and be able to pull up every story from every racer that drove through XX state YY years ago..  I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.  

Various states do indeed have different regulations on max trailer width, towing speeds, who must stop at weigh stations, how heavy you're allowed to go before you have one or multiple axles with brakes and breakaway arrestors..  some states require annual inspections of trailers, some don't even require a license plate on anything under xxxxlb gross weight.  All of that is fact and you've agreed yourself to that point. THIS is why I say do your research.  it ain't JUST the license and the GCWR/ GVWR you need to worry about.

So this way when you're on your way to runoffs in your F350 dually hauling a 46ft trailer with two of your friends cars (you know, since you have room in your trailer and they'll give you gas money to make the tow easier) and then accidentally forget to pull over at a weigh station since TX doesn't require it...  depending on which cop pulls you over to ask why you missed the scales and you're towing at 57mph in a 65mph speed zone (but trailers are max 55mph) and your trailer is 8.5' wide and the state max is 8'...   NOW let's see if the Average Joe driving it has his Class A/B/C driver license and the GCWR of his gitup  But WAIT, there's MORE!  The cop looks inside the trailer and sees THREE race cars in there!  "do all of these belong to you, sir?"  "Uhhh no, two are my friends cars. " "do you have permission to be towing your friends cars? "of course. they're meeting me at the race track on Friday.."  "are they compensating you in any way for this tow?"  "He me a case of beer and gave me money for gas." "DING! That sir means you accepted compensation for this tow and are now a commercial operation.  show me your commercial license, DOT logbook, medical, insurance, and weigh certs from the last weigh station you just passed.  oh you don't have any of that it?  sit right there while I draw up the citations. this will take a while.  oh and you might want to call one of your friends for a ride cause we're prolly gonna impound your commercial operation."

yeah.  really.  I've read stories like that multiple times from racers headed to runoffs who got to pay heavy fines  and some didn't even make the race because they were stopped 3 states away.  I'm sorry you don't believe it. 

Plan your route, do your research BEFORE you hit the road, and make sure the route you're taking is legal with the equipment you're pulling.  That is all. Have a nice evening. :)

Share this post


Link to post

 

I do  believe it, just because I believe your story doesnt make the minimum weights change from state to state.   

If somehow those 3 cars are under the weights established after the adoption of the federal commercial motor vehicle safety act of 1986  it doesnt mean shit whether or not they think its a commercial operation or not.  

That is my only point... I've been talking about weight this entire time and how its the same from state to state. 

 

ETA: look im sure im not articulating well enough, believe me I know what you're saying im just not talking about that and interpreted your comments as being contrarian to an established capacity already determined across the US that individual states would supersede their own existing laws based on a standard .  

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post

I just thought I was posting a funny picture of a truck pulling weight outside it's realistic capability - this has been informative!

Share this post


Link to post

When the Runoffs were in Sonoma last year...well...SCCA posted up all of the applicable applications, permits, etc that were needed...

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...