Jump to content

hornetball

Junkies
  • Content Count

    1436
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    76

About hornetball

  • Rank
    TRACKJUNKIE

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    Granbury, TX
  • Track Vehicle
    '95 Miata, '15 Alfa 4C, '69 Lotus 61. '64 Vette

Recent Profile Visitors

10841 profile views
  1. I don't buy that it's setup. I'm sure it's the Flying Tiger paintjob that makes you fast! 😄
  2. Completed the fuel cell cage. I replaced the top plate on the fuel cell so I could add a fill hose that can be directly accessed. Got the hose from here: https://www.fillernecksupply.com/2-1-4-or-57mm-diameter-1/. Also added a fuel level sensor, vent line and tow hook. Rewired the rear lights and added wiring for the fuel level sensor and fuel pump. Installed a Delphi inline electric fuel pump to perform boost pump duties (mainly used to start the car). It's a flow-through design. The installation is well-protected by the frame. I was able to route a hard line to the front of the car. Again, protected by the frame all the way. New Holley mechanical fuel pump also installed and plumbed. The fuel tank tucks in pretty well. Now for fiberglass work . . . .
  3. Braking? In a Miata? Just kidding.
  4. All I could see of your cooling was from the mod list posted above. Based upon that: 1. You absolutely need an oil cooler for track work. You don't need one for the street. Suggest a DIY approach and use minimum -10AN size hoses to preserve oil pressure. 2. The "FM Stage 1" shroud and fans are probably helping you on the street but are hurting you on track. Honestly, for track work, it's tough to beat a single OEM fan on the drivers side which will open up the rear of the radiator and let your hood vents work their magic. This is the radiator/fan/oil cooler setup I've been running for 6 years. August doesn't scare me! However, I'm not boosted. Cooling is a real challenge with that FMIC. https://www.miataturbo.net/build-threads-57/hornetballs-build-2-meet-red-76869/page14/#post1149743
  5. Grandfathers buy whatever they want. But you have to put in the sacrifice first. 🙂
  6. It's so nice when you find a definitive problem and can relax and know it's fixed. 🙂
  7. Nice. I gave up on splitters. I don't have enough discipline to use them. 😄
  8. Now THAT'LL keep people at least 6 feet away!
  9. A little bit faster than the Eldo.
  10. Had a passenger recently that I "thought" was waving at his buddies in pit lane. That's not actually what he meant. I felt bad. Thank goodness for no carpet.
  11. OK, 'fess up. How often does this happen to you?
  12. For the next time you buy a harness: 2" lap belts are much easier to tighten. I'm 100% in agreement with pull-down over pull-up. After my first set of pull-ups that were nearly impossible to adjust, I've always bought pull-downs. They make lap belts where the pull down adjuster is integrated with the buckle. That's kick-ass. A lot of harness makers are offering this option, it's becoming popular because it works well. Here are some examples: https://www.schroth.com/en/segments/racing/products/details/show/enduro-2x2.html https://www.saferacer.com/collections/racing-harnesses/products/sparco-6pt2steel-harness As stated before, it is critical that the lap belt be "low and tight across your pelvis" (as the flight attendants like to say). That's your body's structure. The only function of a sub strap is to keep the lap belt in that position, so keep it short. Having the buckle located in soft tissue rather than on your pelvis is a great way to die slowly from internal bleeding. The order of tightening is important. Tighten the lap belt first -- as tight as you can get it. Tighten shoulder straps last.
  13. Mounted the Ultrashields. I welded up a seat base from 2" C-channel that bolts to the OEM backing plates. This is convenient because the OEM plates have captive nuts. Also, they "might" be a tested/engineered mounting location (I wonder how much testing did they did in 1964?). Also welded up a large, sturdy seat back brace mounted to the roll bar with heavy duty U-bolts. Both the seat base and seat back brace have captive nuts so mounting the seat is an easy, bolt-in-from-the-top proposition. Finished seats. They are super-solid, no movement whatsoever. I'm going to need a harness bar. With the original plastic seats, the shoulder harness came out of the seat between the shoulder blades. No bueno. Also installed a new Momo steering wheel with NRG quick disconnect. I got one with a fairly large diameter due to the depowered steering. Plus, it looks "vintage." Began working on a fuel cell cage. This is the "outline" and should give good protection for the corners of the cell. Still need to add reinforcing structure and tabs for frame mounting.
×
×
  • Create New...